NGO Shipbreaking Platform publishes the list of ships dismantled worldwide in 2020

Press Release 

Tuesday 2 February 2021

London.UK.  Today the NGO Shipbreaking Platform published the list of ships dismantled worldwide in 2020.  According to the  Platform, 630 ocean-going commercial ships and offshore units were sold to the scrap yards in 2020. Of these vessels, 446 large tankers, bulkers, floating platforms, cargo- and passenger ships were broken down on three beaches in South Asia, amounting to near 90% of the gross tonnage dismantled globally. Greece tops the list of of country dumper in 2020.

Why is Shipbreaking is an issue of concern?

Environmental harm

Ships are considered hazardous waste under international environmental law as they contain many toxic materials and substances within their structures, and onboard as residues. These toxics include, amongst others, cadmium, lead batteries, asbestos, mercury, ozone depleting substances, PAHs, and residue oils, which all need to be managed in a safe and environmentally sound manner. Their export from developed to developing countries is banned by the Basel Convention of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and Their Disposal.

Human Rights abuses

The Platform reports that on the beaches of Alang in India, Chattogram in Bangladesh, and Gadani in Pakistan, where near 90% of the global world tonnage was scrapped last year, the negative consequences of shipbreaking are real and felt by many.

Workers – often exploited migrants, some of them children – are exposed to immense risks. They are killed or seriously injured by fires and falling steel plates, and sickened by exposure to toxic fumes and substances. Coastal biomes, and the local communities depending on them, are devastated by toxic spills and air pollution due to the lack of infrastructure to contain, properly manage and dispose of the many hazardous materials embedded in the ships. 

Read the full report HERE.

For the data visualization of 2020 shipbreaking records, click HERE.

ENDS.

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