The Guardian covers HRAS Investigation into Kiribati Observer Death at Sea

London. UK. The untimely and unexplained death in March 2020 of Kiribati Fisheries Observer Eritara Aati Kaierua while at sea on the Taiwanese-flagged vessel the WIN FAR 636 has been highlighted in the international press by The Guardian, including reference to the recently published  Human Rights at Sea investigation report which took 12 months to compile.

New Fisheries Observer Information and Education Infographic Tool Published

London, UK. In a collaborative international effort with multiple stakeholders, Human Rights at Sea today issues a new Fisheries Observer Infographic 1.0 as a freely available first edition education and information tool detailing the context, scope and safety awareness of this key fisheries role. The tool forms part of the HRAS international programme for the Global Protection of Fisheries Observers which includes detailed reports and resources free to access on the subject matter.

Death of Master, Food and Water Shortages and Failure in State Support leaves Crew Desperate

London. UK.  Following the unexpected death on 19 April 2021 of the Romanian Master of the MV VANTAGE WAVE (IMO: 9506514) Human Rights at Sea has been asked by the deceased's family, and instructed by Gard P&I insurers on behalf of owners’ and crew members’ interests, to bring urgent international attention to the case of the continued failure to repatriate the body after seven weeks by multiple States. The onboard situation is further exacerbated by a rapidly emerging issue of food and water shortages, with resupply and dis-embarkment permissions allegedly being denied by local Chinese authorities at the time of writing.

Japan. Waseda University Law School Profiles Lectures on Human Rights at Sea

London. UK.  Waseda University, Graduate School of Law in Tokyo has hosted a series of lectures under the title of the “Human Rights at Sea with and after COVID-19” with academic support from Human Rights at Sea Trustee Professor Steven Haines and HRAS Advisory Board Members Professor Irini Papanicolopulu, Dr. Sofia Galani and Professor Anna Petrig alongside Professor Seline Trevisanut of Utrecht University.

Flag States: How Can We Get Them to Improve their Performance?

London. UK. Chris Whomersley was Deputy Legal Adviser in the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office prior to his retirement in 2014. The following OP-ED reflects upon the 23 May 21 OP-ED by Captain Michael Lloyd who discussed the role of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea 1982 (UNCLOS), flag States roles and responsibilities, and the actions of the International Maritime Organisation (IMO).

A Review of the Neptune Declaration: Uniting Action by Managers and Charterers but what next?

London. UK. Back in January, the ITF voiced the view that the newly introduced Neptune Declaration had reset expectations and made the shipping industry itself accountable for what amounted to forced labour for seafarers trapped by the COVID-19 pandemic. Nonetheless, accountability for enforcement of international conventions rests first and foremost with the State signatory, and while the Declaration has achieved a significant sign-on, its ability to influence outweighs any ability to enforce its asks.

Podcast with ABC News Pacific Beat on Case of Death of Kiribati Fisheries Observer

PODCAST 21 May 2021 London. UK. Following the publication this week of the 12-month investigation into the circumstances surrounding the death of Kiribati fisheries observer, Eritara Aati Kaierua, at sea between 3-4 March 2020, Human Rights at Sea spoke with ABC News Pacific Beat programme and host, Inga Stünzner, on the case and the actions needed...

Death at Sea. Independent Case Review of Kiribati Fisheries Observer Eritara Aati Kaierua

London. UK. Following a 12-month investigation into the death of Kiribati fisheries observer, Eritara Aati Kaierua, onboard the Taiwanese flagged WIN FAR 636 fishing vessel, Human Rights at Sea publishes an independent case review which explores in detail the incident in March 2020 from the family's perspective having reviewed all publicly-available information as well as evidence collated by the family, supporting organisations, lawyers and the charity.

Watershed for Human Rights in Taiwan’s Fishery Sector

London. UK.  On May 6, 2021, Taiwan’s top ombudsperson institution, the Control Yuan, released a set of wide-ranging recommendations for the government to address the forced labor onboard Taiwan’s distant water fishing (DWF) fleets. This is an issue of increasing international notoriety since the United States Department of Labor listed Taiwan-caught fish in its List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor in September 2020.

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