A Review of the Neptune Declaration: Uniting Action by Managers and Charterers but what next?

London. UK. Back in January, the ITF voiced the view that the newly introduced Neptune Declaration had reset expectations and made the shipping industry itself accountable for what amounted to forced labour for seafarers trapped by the COVID-19 pandemic. Nonetheless, accountability for enforcement of international conventions rests first and foremost with the State signatory, and while the Declaration has achieved a significant sign-on, its ability to influence outweighs any ability to enforce its asks.

IMO and HRAS speak to the BBC about Seafarer Abandonment

London, UK. On Saturday, 17 April, representatives from the International IMO and Human Rights at Sea (HRAS) joined BBC Radio Scotland's national morning programme to discuss the ongoing issue and rising cases of abandoned seafarers globally. Mr. Frederick Kenny, Director of the IMO Legal Affairs and External Relations Division, and David Hammond, CEO, HRAS answered searching questions with the aim of bringing increased understanding to the Scottish audience.

New Zealand Transport Minister updates HRAS on Seafarer welfare funding legislation

London, UK.  The New Zealand Minister of Transport, the Honourable Michael Wood, has confirmed to Human Rights at Sea the forthcoming legislative change to the Maritime Transport Act for long-term and sustainable funding of seafarer's centres. This follows the international report issued by the charity in April 2020, "New Zealand: Under-Funding of Seafarers’ Welfare Services and Poor MLC Compliance” drafted in direct support of the New Zealand Seafarers' Welfare Board's efforts to achieve this change.

HRAS Review of Stowaways. Background, Drivers and Human Consequences

London. UK. Human Rights at Sea today publishes a new independent Insight Briefing Note on stowaways looking at the background to incidents at sea, the drivers for individuals to take such risks and the human consequences. Legally reviewed by shipping lawyers at Norton Rose Fulbright LLP, London, with first-hand accounts supplied from MIRIS International and supported with AIS data-backed infographics from OceanMind, the publication also reflects on the recent Nave Andromeda case off the South Coast of the UK.

For Seafarers COVID is not someone else’s problem

London. UK. When we hear of large corporations, charterers, refusing to accept any costs or delays in order to allow over-worked seafarers to return to their homes, what are we to think? We could think of all the people that have acted responsibly and made sacrifices in their personal and working lives to reduce the risk of other members of their community contracting COVID.

New Zealand Government to change maritime law to fund seafarer’s centres

London. UK. Human Rights at Sea is pleased to report that the Labour-led New Zealand Government has publicly announced it will fulfil its manifesto pledge and commitment to improve seafarer welfare through funding from the maritime levies triggered by lobbying from the Seafarers Welfare Board and the March 2020 report from HRAS ‘Under funding of Seafarer’ Welfare Services and Poor MLC Compliance’.

International Women’s Day 2021 – #ChooseToChallenge

Today marks International Women Day, a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity, which in the case of the maritime industry, remains an issue not yet satisfactorily tackled.  Achieving gender parity in the maritime industry will require addressing conscious and unconscious gender biases. 

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