Seaspiracy documentary raises crucial points about human rights abuse at sea

Editorial 12 April 2021 London. UK. As The Guardian’s reporter, George Monboit headlined in his April 7th article review of the new Netflix Seaspiracy documentary. ‘The film gets some things wrong, but it exposes the grim ecological destruction of the Earth’s oceans‘. As important as ocean conservation is for the future of humanity, so is the...

WCPFC 17: Human and Labour Rights Developments and Challenges

London. UK. Human Rights at Sea has Observer status with the Western and Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) and attended the virtual WCPFC 17th Regular Session between 7-15th December 2020. The charitable NGO presented a detailed intervention on its peer-reviewed proposal for a new and dedicated Conservation and Management Measure (CMM) and follow on paper covering the ramifications for Small Island Developing States (SIDS), specifically focusing on the safety, security and well-being of fisheries observers.

Fisheries Observer Model Conservation & Management Measure Published

London. UK. Human Rights at Sea publishes the fourth in a series of independent international reports and reviews concerning the safety, security and well-being of Fisheries Observers in the Western and Central Pacific region titled: 'Draft Proposal for Model Western & Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) Conservation & Management Measure (CMM) on Human Rights and Labour Rights Protections for Fisheries Observers' Safety, Security and Well-being'.

Pacific Fisheries Observer Safety, Security and Well-being Reports Published

London, UK. Human Rights at Sea today issues two new major international peer-reviewed reports focusing on Fisheries Observer safety, security and well-being in the Western and Central Pacific region, including for Observers employed by Commonwealth States through Regional Fisheries Management Organisations.

Fisheries Observers’ Survey for Western and Central Pacific now live

London. UK. Human Rights at Sea in partnership with the University of Nottingham's Rights Lab and supported by the Association for Professional Observers, has today gone live with a new Fisheries Observer survey as part of ongoing work addressing the health, safety and well-being of Fisheries Observers in the Western and Central Pacific region.

Understanding the Role of a Fisheries Observer

‘‘If an observer discovers things they weren’t intended to know about, they can face intimidation, threats, violence and, in the worst cases, murder.’’ London. UK. Human Rights at Sea today issues the latest in its series of Insight Briefing Notes covering key human rights issues within the maritime environment. Titled 'The Role of a Fisheries Observer' the insight is provided by Martin Purves, who prior to his present role as the Managing Director of the International Pole and Line Foundation, spent years at sea in fisheries management roles, including as a fisheries observer.

Marine Stewardship Council’s funding pledge to address fishery observer safety welcomed

Press Release 23 July 2020 London. UK. Human Rights at Sea today welcomes the announcement by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) that new research funding will be made available to address the issue of improvements to Fisheries Observer safety following recent international initiatives and public reports on the issue. The announcement comes after the recent...

Fisheries Observer Deaths at Sea Report version availability increased

London. UK. Following unprecedented demand for copies of the new Human Rights at Sea fisheries report 'Fisheries Observer Deaths at Sea, Human Rights and the Role and Responsibilities of Fisheries Organisations ', the charity has updated its download options to provide both high and low resolution versions for download.

Human Rights at Sea Welcomes WWF Statement

London.UK. Human Rights at Sea welcomes and supports the WWF statement on the issue of Human Rights Abuses at Sea published on the 3rd of July 2020. The full Statement can be read here and it is also replicated below: "WWF is committed to building a future where human well-being and nature conservation go hand-in-hand. Tens of millions of people work in this sector, either at capture, during processing or as part of scientific data collection. Observers are vulnerable at sea because the data they collect affects the stock assessments and various verification and/or certification processes – leaving them potential targets for intimidation and abuse, as has been reported in relation to some fishing vessels.

REPORT: Fisheries Observer Deaths at Sea, Human Rights and the Role and Responsibilities of Fisheries Organisations

“Is there a ‘thank you’ to the observer? Something to sustain his widow and children for a few years, at least? Not often. The final ignominy is that compensation or insurance takes ‘a little while’ to come, if it does at all.” London, UK. Human Rights at Sea today publishes an extensive human rights focused report looking into the ongoing issue of Fisheries Observer protections and deaths at sea in the complex and highly-competitive commercial fishing industry supply chains that they work in.

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