Watershed for Human Rights in Taiwan’s Fishery Sector

London. UK.  On May 6, 2021, Taiwan’s top ombudsperson institution, the Control Yuan, released a set of wide-ranging recommendations for the government to address the forced labor onboard Taiwan’s distant water fishing (DWF) fleets. This is an issue of increasing international notoriety since the United States Department of Labor listed Taiwan-caught fish in its List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor in September 2020.

Critical review of FISH Standard for Crew exposes weaknesses of Industry-led certification

London, UK. The Seafood Working Group (SWG) of which 28 member organisations, including Human Rights at Sea, has issued a collective critical statement as to the current standing of the industry-led Fairness, Integrity, Safety and Health (FISH) Standard for Crew highlighting the key weaknesses which will prevent it being an effective tool to address human and labour rights abuses for fishers.

Seaspiracy documentary raises crucial points about human rights abuse at sea

Editorial 12 April 2021 London. UK. As The Guardian’s reporter, George Monboit headlined in his April 7th article review of the new Netflix Seaspiracy documentary. ‘The film gets some things wrong, but it exposes the grim ecological destruction of the Earth’s oceans‘. As important as ocean conservation is for the future of humanity, so is the...

Indonesian Fishers fight for Safe Working Conditions and Repatriation from the Marshall Islands

London. UK. / Indonesia. The prevalent issue of poor and abusive conditions for Indonesian migrant fishers continues to be highlighted internationally by local NGOs. Destructive Fishing Watch (DFW) Indonesia has been sharing evidence gathered to further shine a spotlight on fisher's working circumstances, including during the COVID-19 pandemic, which fail to reflect the safety and well-being intent of the likes of the ILO C188 Working in Fishing Convention and highlight failures to look after migrant crew when contracts are terminated.

Geneva Declaration on Human Rights at Sea receives Europeche endorsement

London. UK. During the recent 19 November 2020 webinar covering the latest updates in respect of the ILO Work in Fishing (C188) Convention, Ment van der Zwan, employers’ spokesman in the EU social dialogue committee on sea-fisheries of  Europeche, highlighted the need to reflect the four fundamental principles of the Geneva Declaration on Human Rights at Sea. 

Fisheries Observer Model Conservation & Management Measure Published

London. UK. Human Rights at Sea publishes the fourth in a series of independent international reports and reviews concerning the safety, security and well-being of Fisheries Observers in the Western and Central Pacific region titled: 'Draft Proposal for Model Western & Central Pacific Fisheries Commission (WCPFC) Conservation & Management Measure (CMM) on Human Rights and Labour Rights Protections for Fisheries Observers' Safety, Security and Well-being'.

Insight Briefing Note: Slavery at Sea and Emperors of the Deep

London. UK. / New York. USA. Human Rights at Sea today publishes the latest in its series of Insight Briefing Notes looking at the work by US-based film-maker, author and ocean conservationist William McKeever into the issues of slavery at sea, working conditions, the need for fisheries observers, and the effects on the shark fishing and shark fin trade.

Fisheries Observer Deaths at Sea Report version availability increased

London. UK. Following unprecedented demand for copies of the new Human Rights at Sea fisheries report 'Fisheries Observer Deaths at Sea, Human Rights and the Role and Responsibilities of Fisheries Organisations ', the charity has updated its download options to provide both high and low resolution versions for download.

South Western Fish Producer Organisation releases 2019 Business and Human Rights Audit

London, UK / Ivybridge, Devon, UK.  Today, sees the public release of the inaugural South Western Fish Producers Organisation (SWFPO) Ltd Business and Human Rights Audit dated 10 January 2019 through the Human Rights at Sea independent platform. Commenced in late 2018 and submitted in January 2019, the comprehensive report was commissioned by SWFPO as part of their internal drive to develop levels of awareness and standards relating to human rights within their supply chain.

Taiwan Government Positively and Comprehensively Responds to Human Rights at Sea Fisheries Report

"The Presidential Office Human Rights Consultative Committee, the Human Rights Promotion Task Force of the Executive Yuan and the Coordination Conference for Human Trafficking Prevention have been inviting relevant ministries and agencies to convene meeting regularly. Relevant issues being addressed in such meetings have already embraced the philosophy of human rights at sea." London, UK / Taipei, Taiwan. Human Rights at Sea is pleased to publish the formal Taiwan Government response from the Director General of the Taiwan Fisheries Agency to the charity's October 2019 '“Baseline Study on the Awareness and Application of Human Rights in Taiwan’s Fishing Industry”, as a matter of transparency and reflection of positive State engagement with the organisation.

Ending Exploitative Recruitment Fees for Seafarers and Fishers

London.UK. “These misleading and exploitative recruitment practices by some labour recruiters and overseas employment agencies are a continued blight on raising social welfare and human rights standards in the global maritime sector”. Human Rights at Sea today publishes its latest briefing note on exploitative recruitment fees in the maritime sector and calls for an end to such burdensome fees for workers in a call to action.

Labour Disputes and Power imbalances in the Taiwanese Fishing Industry

London. UK. Following recent advocacy work aimed at achieving ongoing improvements in the working conditions and protections for all fishers in the Taiwanese fishing industry, Human Rights at Sea today issues a new evidential case study. Highlighting the worrying power imbalance between migrant fishers, recruitment and manning agencies resulting in poor welfare support, the case study also highlights the need to align national polices and standards with international convention.

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